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Low level of exposure, literacy hinder women’s financial education

According to the World Bank, there is a 14 per cent gap between men who own bank accounts and women who don’t. What this means is that more women (than men) are financially excluded even though they are major drivers of the informal economy and the more popular caregivers at the domestic front. This is the reason Onyeka Akpaida is leading a campaign, through Rendra Foundation, to improve the resilience and economic outcomes of underserved women by encouraging them to become financially included and financially literate.

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How Ghana’s New Digital Finance Policy Can Drive Women’s Inclusion

Ghana made waves earlier this year when it launched the world’s first digital financial services (DFS) policy, building on the past five years of explosive DFS growth in the country.

There are reasons to be optimistic that this target is achievable for men, who already reached 62 percent account ownership in 2017, but what about women? Can the new policy help to close the gender gap?

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World Humanitarian Day 2020 – A Tribute to Real Life Heroes

You have not started living until you start giving”- Onyeka Akpaida

The humanitarian crisis has always existed and sometimes when it is not close to home; it is easy to ignore. The Covid-19 pandemic is definitely one that has in a morbid way, united us globally.

In the face of this global pandemic, increased poverty and growing insecurity, humanitarians and front-line workers are going beyond their duty call to make life bearable for those who have been most affected by the pandemic and insecurity crisis.

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Leveraging Digitized Social Welfare Programs to Deepen Female Financial Inclusion in Africa

The McKinsey Global Institute estimates that widespread adoption and use of digital payments and financial services could increase the GDP of all emerging markets by $3.7 trillion by 2025. This additional GDP could create up to 95 million new jobs, raise overall productivity and investment levels, and make government spending more efficient. Interestingly, no one stands to benefit more from this growth than women.

It is a fact beyond argument that women and girls shoulder the global burden of poverty. Decades of research show that poverty deprives women of vital health, education, and socioeconomic opportunities throughout their lives.

For women in low and middle-income countries, digital savings, credit, and payments services can provide them with a critical link to the formal economy and a gateway to greater economic security and personal empowerment. When women-headed households in Kenya adopted mobile money accounts, poverty dropped, savings rose, and 185,000 women left agricultural jobs for more reliable, higher-paying positions in business or retail

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